Part II: Truman’s depiction of the characters

Part II: Truman’s depiction of the characters

events that unfolded during the crime that laid the foundation for his non-fiction title In Cold Blood are largely disputed. While no one denies the years of labor that Truman slaved or the countless notes taken by the author as he drudged through the murderous events, some do dispute the novels classification. The genre of non-fiction is the accounts of events believed to be factual. However, far too many individuals have spoken on behalf of Truman’s alleged story construction for the sake of the arts. In spite of the book making millions and receiving top honors in the literary world, critics have challenged the story’s authenticity.

There were several false claims made to the stories structure of scenes and changes in dialogue. The characters were also individually addressed as falsely depicted via Truman’s view. For example, Bonnie (Clutters wife) was communicated as a woman struggling with depression. This characteristic was disputed by Bonnie’s own living relatives. The one character that I personally believe was given a skewed character explanation was Smith. Smith was one of the two murderers involved in the Clutter’s families deaths. Upon further research of Smith I found that his character was explained as being intelligent and artistic. I believe that Truman’s exaggeration of a murderer made for a better read (It should also be considered that this is how Truman was described). In the theatrical art form such a character could leave the audience confused and looking for answers. I believe that Truman’s homosexual feelings that were alleged towards Smith affected the portrayal of this supposed non-fictional character.

Peele, Thomas. San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved December 22, 2104 from http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_22621968/new-documents-raise-more-doubts-about-credibility-truman

Part III: The point of view from John Grisham’s work Somewhere for Everyone is one of compassion. Grisham examines the often overlooked lifestyle of the homeless. Grisham’s examining point is that of a mixture. It is not a mixture, in the literal sense of this weeks question which states, “a point of view from a member within that society” but in my opinion it is recognizable as a mixed point of view because while Grisham is not homeless, he did attempt to understand their life via personal experience. Grisham explains his childhood experiences with the homeless, an unsettling personal experience with one particular homeless individual during Grisham’s adulthood and lastly he attempted to communicate with the homeless society citing a few purposeful personal encounters. Grisham explains the encounters as he cites, “I almost froze on a park bench one night as I tried to strike up a conversation with a homeless man who suspected I was from the IRS. I talked politics with a panhandler near the Capitol” (Grisham, 143). However, in the most literally sense of the question it is clearly communicated that Grisham’s view is that of an outsiders. As he states, “In the spring of ’97 my research took me into the world of the homeless. I made the two-hour drive from my comfortable home in the Virginia countryside to the streets of D.C.” (Grisham, 143).

Grisham, John. Somewhere for Everyone. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from http://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/1259391094/epubcfi/6/58%5B;vnd.vst.idref=chap21%5D

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